Tag Archive | religion

Into Chiapas- Mexico Part 2

Having experienced the wonders of the Yucatán peninsula, we were hungry to continue our journey to another part of the country. People had told me that “Chiapas is the REAL Mexico” and that the Yucatán is very touristy and not the real thing. I am not sure what this means, and have questioned this in regard to other countries (China for example). But truth be told, the scenery in between the cities in the Yucatán was deadly boring and flat, so we were quite happy to board a bus and travel 10 hours to reach the UNESCO  world heritage site of Palenque.

The ride was comfortable, with spacious seats, air conditioning and a toilet. The screens showed movies in Spanish but with the volume turned down. The view was in fact wonderful. For the first hour or so we were riding along the coastline, so we saw the sea, fisherman, seabirds and little port towns. Then gradually we swung inland, and the scenery began to get green and hilly. The hills were dotted with farmlands, horses and cows in fields and a much richer variety of flora and fauna than we had seen in the scrubby scenery of the Yucatán. We eventually arrived in Palenque at around 5.30, in time to check into our hotel, book a tour to the famous  ruins for the next morning, and get some dinner. The street we stayed in, a neighbourhood known as “Canada” was all hotels, tour companies and restaurants.

Next morning, bright and early we were picked up by minibus to tour Palenque jungle ruins, and then a visit to Misol Ha waterfall and Agua Azul natural pools. What can I say about Palenque? I think it was really one of the highlights of the trip. There is something about jungle+ temple which = Indiana Jones. Even though you are not really being an explorer, you feel like one. We had a guide for the ruins and a separate one for the jungle, which I was glad of, because I felt like we could have easily got lost. The site is extremely impressive, especially when you learn that only 10% has been excavated, and most of the temples are still under the jungle, and likely to stay that way. When we asked why, it seems that 1. there are no funds to continue and 2. the ecologists and the archaeologists are pitted against each other. Anyway, what you see is certainly impressive, to say the least.

After the tour of the ruins, and the walk through the jungle (not easy for us, since everyone else was young and agile- but we kept up) we went back to the minibus for a quick trip to the Misol Ha waterfalls and then to lunch and a swim at Agua Azul.

This place REALLY was as great as it looks in the photo. The water was pretty cold at first but after we got in, we really enjoyed the swim and the lunch at one of the many restaurants nearby. We returned to the hotel in Palenque exhausted after a full and exciting day. There were people on our bus who opted to take a collectivo (shared minibus/taxi) directly to San Cristobal de las Casas that same evening (people that we actually ran into when we got there the next day) but we were glad that we went back to the hotel to rest, and travel on by day bus the next day. (But more of this in the next entry)

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Agua Azul

And so, next day we again boarded an ADO long haul bus to travel 7 hours to San Cristóbal de las Casas, a town we had heard very good things about. At an elevation of 2,200m this is a little town surrounded by mountains, and inhabited by a mixture of tattooed and pierced young musician types, who look like they are refugees from Woodstock, and the hard-working local people, many of whom belong to minority ethnic groups, such as the Tzotzil and Tzetzal. Their religious practices are a strange mixture of Catholic and Native Indian religions. As mentioned above, the road to San Cristobal was very long, but this turned out to be because of the route that the public bus takes. Instead of going directly to cover the 218km in 4 hours, it switched back to pass through Villahermosa and then back east again. It transpired later that the direct route was dubious- we met a Canadian couple who had hired a car and tried to drive directly to San Cristobal but had run into a roadblock which made them turn back and return (at night) – rather scary. The origin of the roadblock appears to be some kind of demonstration or “political unrest” … as I said, we were glad we had taken the public bus. The folks who went by minibus also said the road they had taken had been extremely windy and unpleasant, and some of them had felt unwell on the way up to the town.

San Cristóbal is hard to describe objectively. It is, as mentioned, high up in the mountains. Every street you walk down, the mountains rise up in the distance and surround the town. The houses are colourful as in Mérida and Valladolid, but with a greater simplicity and have something endearing about them. The town has a slow pace to it. Our host, James, at The Hub hostel put it this way “Many people come for a couple of days and end up staying for 4 years. ” The main drag has tons of hip restaurants, coffee bars and shops, and leads to the main Zócalo, which in turn is surrounded by hip restaurants and coffee bars. One thing we noticed immediately is that there is live music of all kinds going on all the time. There is not a whole lot to do in San Cris except eat, drink, listen to music and people watch. But sometimes that’s all you want to do, right?

We did do two day trips from San Cristóbal. The first was to Sumidero Canyon, a deep rift where you sail down the Rio Grijalva  in a cruise boat for about 90 minutes. The guide spoke only Spanish, as we were the only foreign tourists on the boat, but really no explanation was needed, as we spotted crocodiles, seabirds of various kinds and a small grotto with a Virgin Mary in it, and some strange outcrops of rock in odd shapes. At one point the canyon walls are one kilometre high, and all in all it was a fun day out.

The second trip we made was to San Juan Chamula, a village in the mountains just outside San Cristobal, where the locals famously have a church where they practice their weird version of Catholicism mixed with local Indian belief. It’s all very secret there and you are not allowed to photograph the inside of the church. All I can say is that we saw a woman waving eggs over her head, and that the floor had some kind of palm fronds strewn over it. The statues around the church were also a bit creepy.

In any case, the whole day trip was fascinating, despite the compulsory stop in the textile shop to buy handicrafts made by the locals. Actually, this was more than a shop, as it seemed to be a house where the extended family live together, doing weaving, embroidery and cooking, which you can watch as you browse the handicrafts.

After a wonderful week of music and chilling we decided it was time to move on to our next stop, the amazing Oaxaca in a new state, Oaxaca State.. stay tuned!

Monks on a bus and monkeys on the roof

Now I’ve got your attention. This had to be the title for this blog entry, especially after I saw the number of “likes” my monks on a bus photo got on Facebook. Here it is:

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Travelling to school

Anyway, how to sum up this crazy experience of a month teaching Buddhist monks in Bhiksu University, Sri Lanka? Was it what we had expected? Of course not! Things never are. On the plane over to Sri Lanka we again looked at each other wondering whether we were totally insane. How bad could it be, we thought? We had spoken via Skype to the Reverend Mediyawe Piyarathana, the English lecturer in charge of the program, and we had been interviewed by Paul Ellmes of http://www.giveafigvolunteering.com, who also lived there in the city, and seemed to be a nice, friendly chap.  Just for a month….. what could go wrong, we thought. Well one or two small inconveniences did occur. I hobbled home on crutches  with a sprained foot and a touch of gastroenteritis. Both of us were exhausted.. but to say that the month wasn’t the most fantastic experience would not  be doing it justice. Things are never straightforward when you fly halfway around the world. We certainly learnt as much from the monks as they did from us. But mostly not about meditation, Buddhist philosophy and so on, but more about how people are just people everywhere. The monks were all MA and PhD lecturers in Buddhist culture and philosophy, Sanskrit, comparative religions and other subjects. But they were above all lovely kind open-hearted people with whom we talked about anything and  everything in class.

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Our first colonial abode

The first few days after our arrival were the full moon festival or Poson. This meant that thousands of devotees, dressed in white, had flocked to the town to celebrate and visit the many holy places. Anuradhapura, a UNESCO heritage site,  is the old capital and a famous centre of Buddhist worship that houses the famous Boddhi Tree and many other important sites. Our Reverend took us to visit many of them, including  MahintaleRuwanwelisaya and Abhayagiri where we met the Chief Incumbent monk himself, and actually had tea at his house. He was a lovely laughing chap who had been to study in China so we exchanged a few Chinese words, which was all rather amusing. Anyone who entered the house bowed and kissed his feet, and we were directed to low stools while he sat on a higher chair. Apparently we were told by Paul that this monk is pretty much the second most important guy in the country after the President.

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Full moon celebrations at Mahintale

The Reverend took us to the holy sites to experience the tradition of dansale at the celebration. People had travelled from afar to cook meals and distribute them free to others. We saw huge lines of people waiting to receive meals, sweets and even free ice cream. The Rev took us in to eat something and (embarrassingly for us) passed in front of the whole line since he is a monk. It was useless to object. The monks are revered by all. This happened again in supermarket queues and elsewhere. Sometimes people would come up to him and hand him gifts in exchange for prayers and blessings.

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Family in dansale tent

One evening the Rev took us to visit a nunnery. The kids seemed quite well cared for and happy. The Reverend himself became a monk as his mother had to travel to work in Saudi Arabia and so she entrusted him to the monastery. He speaks to her frequently on the phone and doesn’t seem to have any problem with her decision. He loves his work helping people and is extremely devoted to the worshipers, and all the monks are very keen to help their devotees by giving them advice and hearing their problems. They help with all kinds of problems, and are always available to help in any way they can. The monks seem to have a far better life than many of the poor rural people and have a great education and live comfortably in their temples.

 

All in all, we were royally looked after during our whole stay. Everything was paid for by the University, including our board and lodging, and trips to Wilpattu Safari Park  and Sigiriya  Lion Rock (where I slipped and sprained my foot after managing to ascend and descend all the steps successfully) . The accommodation provided by the University was a little spartan: the initial place we were given looked amazing from the outside (a gorgeous old colonial building) but was somewhat run down inside, and had no hot water or functioning wifi. We therefore asked to move to a hotel but the inimitable Reverend Piyarathana who was responsible for us flatly refused and said he would find alternative accommodation. This proved to be the Vice Chancellor’s Lodge which was equally impressive from the outside, and actually did have hot water, good wifi and a/c. This is not to say that it was palatial, but it was okay. The original place came complete with a cook.So now we had no cook. “No problem “,said the Reverend. Every day he would send his chauffeur-driven car round to fetch us and transport us to Mango Mango, the local Indian restaurant where we could get good food just like in London!

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The Reverend’s driver Sisera enjoying his bettel

At night we heard jackals and dogs fighting outside, and monkeys jumping on the roof. There were loads of monkeys and wild dogs wandering around the campus. In fact I have never seen so many dogs in my life.Apparently because they are Buddhists, the inhabitants cannot get the dogs neutered, or do anything to deplete their numbers- many looked mangy and neglected- so sad. We also saw innumerable cows wandering around, mongoose and a snake .And one evening a tiny frog jumped out of the toilet!

Every day we went off to class either by tuk- tuk (called a three-wheeler in Sri Lanka) or on the school bus together with all the monks. Class was from 8 till 11.30am with a 30 minute tea break , and again in the afternoon from 13.00 till 16.30 with a similar break. In the break we got tea, bananas, and a host of other (mainly spicy) unidentifiable foods. We did find it amusing to see a load of saffron robed monks all sitting around munching on their bananas. In class we did much the same as in any oral class I have ever taught- debates, discussions, pair work etc, on any topic we wished. The monks were lively , highly knowledgeable and fun to work with. We had internet and projector in the classroom and as much photocopied material as we needed.

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Monks in class

After our 20 days teaching were up we were presented with a gold- plated award for our work, and the students got certificates for completing the course. Many students had come over to visit me while I was laid up  with the  sprained foot, and had presented me with gifts such as home made curd, sliced bread, marmite (!) , fruits and other goodies.  Our next door neighbour monk, also called Piyarathana (and hence christened by me Piyarathana number 2) came over and brought us many fruits, and on our last evening invited us into his place for a cooked meal, which he cooked personally.They were all incredibly kind and hospitable and I will miss them all.

We then had 3 days at the beach resort of Trincomalee on the north east coast,where we relaxed and took a sailing boat to see dolphins, and visited the historic site of Fort Frederick. This was a nice way to wind down our trip, and then finally we spent two nights in Colombo, where unfortunately we couldn’t see much due to my sprained foot, but we did see the Galle Fort promenade, which was enjoyable.

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Fishermen on beach at Trincomalee

So if this has piqued your appetite and you are interested in teaching in Sri Lanka please contact Paul Ellmes at http://giveafigvolunteering.com/ or the Revered Mediyawe Piyarathana at revpiyarathana@busl.ac.lk  or on Skype at piyarathana78. You too can have an unforgettable experience and do something worthwhile!

NOTE: Paul Ellmes says that in future all accommodation arrangements will be taken care of by his organization so I am sure all will run smoothly! So go ahead and message him on his webpage. You will have a fantastic time!

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View from the top of the Sigiriya Lion Rock Palace

 

 

 

Where have I been and where am I going?

Apologies for the long silence! Of course I have been disorientated by leaving China, and in mourning for my China life.But never fear! I have been travelling and not sitting and crying.However I have definitely been a little stagnant too,as life at home is not life on the road.This is the difficulty that long-term travellers face,how to be in a “normal,routine” life at home,with all that entails,and how to get on with one’s  non-travelling friends and relations.This has been discussed at length by many a travel blogger so I won’t dwell on it.

But China beckons once again,and it seems that in March we will be back in Xiamen in the gainful employ of another university. Ssssssh,nothing is final yet! But fear not dear reader. You will now get a glimpse of our glamorous life in Israel and the wonderful places that you can visit here,if you are lucky enough to travel here.How can you pretend to be a traveller in your own country? Easy,just host some guests from abroad and you instantly become a tourist,traveller or onlooker.

So when our dear friends Barry and Renee arrived from Hawaii by way of Shanghai we were delighted to take the opportunity of showing them around this tiny but vibrant and diverse country.

We of course began with Jerusalem which has a wealth of sites for the historically minded traveller.We showed them the Haas Promenade in East Talpiyot which affords one of the best views of the Old City. We showed them the Mahane Yehuda Market with its jostling populace and wonderful fruit and spice stalls,and we enjoyed a great meal at the Lebanese Restaurant of my friend from Marseilles.And we explored the Old Train Station and the area of town where the Ethiopian Church and Russian Church stand practically side by side.Exploring these places with guests from abroad allowed me to view them with renewed pleasure and to appreciate the richness and complexity of this weird city I have lived in for the last 30 years.

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Russian Church in the Russian Compound,Jerusalem

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Ethiopian Church,Jerusalem

We showed them the lovely village of Ein Karem, one of my favourite places here, with its slightly Italian feel,its pretty churches and yuppy restaurants. The weather smiled on us and the sites were very photogenic.

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The Russian Orthodox Gorny or “Muscovy” convent of Ein Karem

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General view of Ein Karem from the steps of the Sisters of the Rosary Church.

We then continued down to the Dead Sea and Massada.I had not been there for a long time,and the site appeared much bigger than I remembered, and made for a very impressive day out.We even managed to get lost on the top of Massada and managed to miss the way out!

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Top of Massada

Next post will be about our wonderful trip up North to the Galilee and the Golan,and the Jacobs Ladder Folk Festival,which really deserves a blog post all of its own.! Stay tuned…..

Dragon Boat Festival at Shishi

Yesterday was the Fifth day of the Fifth lunar month ,otherwise known in the East as Duanwu or the Dragon Boat Festival, which is celebrated not only in China but I believe also in Vietnam and other countries in the region.Funnily enough this year it fell on the same day as Shavuot  which also features water-splashing-but more of that later. The school organized a trip for the foreign teachers to the neighbouring town of Shishi, which traditionally hosts some games and activities to mark this  holiday. So we piled onto a bus and set off for Shishi,about an hour away from Jimei out east in the direction of Quanzhou. After getting briefly lost the bus arrived at around 11am in the dusty crowded provincial town which was bursting with people ,many carrying coloured flags and all streaming towards the sea.When we arrived at the seashore however,it appeared that the tide was out.Clearly no sea-based activity was going to happen for a while.The people informed us that the activities would only begin around 1pm- it was already a sweltering 35C and there was nothing at all to do Fortunately we found a small snack bar that served us cold mango smoothies, and which mercifully had air conditioning and even wifi. So we all trooped inside and settled down to eat the packed lunch the school had provided (mostly inedible) and wait. At around 12.30 we went back again to the coast,which was by now extremely crowded ,so that we could hardly see anything . Finally we were permitted to get onto the roof of a nearby temple,which had been prepared with chairs for visiting officials rand reporters. From this vantage point we had a great view of all the celebrations,and started to enjoy things,despite the oppressive heat.We had attended the Dragon Boat celebrations in Xiamen and Jimei the year before,but they had been very different from what we saw in Shishi.In Jimei different teams of rowers representing the different colleges and universities had competed in dragon boat races using highly decorated boats, the events rather resembling the Oxtbridge boat race.In Shishi however,there were firstly colourful parades of marching groups in different costumes,some carrying models of ancient boats.Then there were brass bands. Then men came down to the water with sacks of live ducks, which were tipped into the sea to be caught by fishermen. And many different kinds of boats performed varous  other activities which were hard to follow,but which included splashing water over each other in mock warfare.

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People carrying model boat

 

All in all the whole thing was pretty interesting if rather noisy and confusing.But hey,that’s part of travelling to untouristy locations right?

Well we have only three more days left in Jimei before we pack up and get the train down to Shenzhen and from there to Hong Kong and Laos.So hopefully I will be updating next from the Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

Stay tuned and please feel free to leave comments.

 

 

Mid Autumn Festival (the bigger picture for my bro)

Well today’s post will be a little cultural/anthropological in orientation as my brother read my blog and complained it was too personal and focused on food and trivial details.So today I want to give a bit of background on the current holiday in China,which is called the Mid Autumn Festival.This festival is a popular harvest festival celebrated by Chinese people on the fifteenth day of the eighth month of the Lunar Calendar. It is also known as “Mooncake Festival”, Lantern Festival” or “Moon Festival”.It is customary at this time to visit your family and friends and to eat a celebratory meal,and to go to beautiful places to look at the full moon.Since it is a National cultural heritage holiday there is an official holiday so that people can travel and visit their relatives.But in Xiamen where we live,there is a special tradition which is only observed here.IT is called “Bobing” and it is a kind of gambling game.

“WE experienced it for the time last year,when our university took us (all the foreign teachers and some Chinese ones) to a lovely five-star hotel.There we were given a buffet lunch and then after that we went upstairs to some tables,where we rolled six dice in a porcelain bowl.The rules are a little complicated but basically the number four is your friend.According to the number of fours that you throw you can win prizes.

Explanation as follows:(skip if you aren’t interested in the details)

“The 300-year-old custom of mooncake gambling dates back to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). The inventor, Zheng Chenggong (1624-62), a general of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), stationed his army in Xiamen. Zheng was determined to recover Taiwan, which was occupied by Dutch invaders since 1624.

When every Mid-Autumn Festival came, the soldiers naturally missed their families but fought with heroical determination to drive off the aggressors.

General Zheng and his lower officer Hong Xu invented mooncake gambling to help relieve homesickness among the troops.

The gambling game has six ranks of awards, which are named as the winners in ancient imperial examinations, and has 63 different sized mooncakes as prizes.

From the lowest to the highest, the titles of six ranks are Xiucai (the one who passed the examination at the county level), Juren (a successful candidate at the provincial level), Jinshi (a successful candidate in the highest imperial examination), Tanhua, Bangyan and Zhuangyuan (respectively the number three to number one winners in the imperial examination at the presence of the emperor).

Game players throw the dice by turns. Different pips they count win the player a relevant “title” and corresponding type of mooncakes.”

In simple language:-

If you get a six on all the dice you get the jackpot.If you get 1 through 6 that is the highest score.But even if you only throw two ro three fours,you can win something.So we all went home with tubes of toothpaste,soap ,blankets,boxes of mooncakes and other prizes.

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Mooncakes

This year we were informed that due to budget cuts and suchlike from the Government we were not able to go to a hotel so we only did the gambling game in a room at the University,and the prizes were only mooncakes from small to large.But when I got home I was invited by a neighbour, whose husband is a University teacher,to the neiighbourhood  Bobing game downstairs outside our building.There the residents had clubbed together to buy various prizes and there were two tables of gamblers,one for kids and one for adults.I joined in there but didn’t win anything.It was great to watch the faces of the kids as we all threw the dice in turn.

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Our neighbour’s daughter Ray shaking the dice

Yesterday we went for a walk around Jimei (our neighbourhood) and checked out the new Wanda Shopping Mall that has opened here.It was being built when we left for the summer holidays and now it is open and was buzzing with people because of the holiday.It has 4 floors,one floor completely devoted to restaurants,and there was a sort of traditional dance show  going on when we arrived,but I think it was just an ad for a cellphone company or something.Anyway,the mall has an IMAX cinema complex,Haagen Dasz ice cream and all the usual Chinese -American favourites ie Pizza Hut,McDonalds and so on.But it looks very upscale and expensive.IT is also spotlessly clean (for now!)

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Dance show at the Mall

 

We also met up again with our friends Jennifer and Hamburger last week and went with them to Jiageng Stadium near our house where there was a very silly exhibition of trick art or 3 D pictures where you can insert yourself into the picture and take a photo.This is kind of childish but amusing fun especially if you have small kids or friends who behave like kids.We took lots of silly photos,and it felt good to be back with our Xiamen friends again.There are quite a few new teachers at XMUT,and we have not had time to make everyone’s acquaintance yet.I hope we will have the opportunity to do that,once the holidays are over.Next week is National Week and we have 8 days off so we are off to Taiwan -t’s kind of like the Rosh Hashana-Yom Kippur-Succot period in Israel when you can’t really get anything done until after the festivals.So far the classes I have seen have been very nice and with quite a high level of English.More after Taiwan!

 

Sports Day and trip to Quanzhou

This weekend we had the promised sports day which was cancelled last week due to the rain .So we were informed that we would have no classes on Thursday afternoon or on Friday,which made no difference to me as I don’t teach then,but Danny got two hours off. So we decided to head to Quanzhou on Friday, a place which I had heard was interesting historically and only a half hour train ride from Xiamen. We had actually passed through on the train to Fuzhou on our way to the Speaking Competition.

But first we had Sports Day,on which all University lessons were cancelled to allow the whole school to parade around the running track and do various other incomprehensible things. WE were asked to meet all the other foreign teachers outside the International Office at 12.30. We then had to march around the running track in lines of 6 and wave to the crowd. It was hilarious. We waved periodically and said “Ni hao” to the students and they all roared with laughter and photographed us. Then there were short speeches by various important university dudes (none of which we could understand of course) and at 2.30pm we were free to go!

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On Friday morning we caught the 11am train to Quanzhou which was the city from which Marco Polo had supposedly sailed back to Italy.In the ticket line we met a lovely young student who helped us buy tickets and told us she lived in Quanzhou and studied at Huaquiao University in Jimei,just near our house. She sat with us on the train and told us she was a teacher of Chinese to foreigners and was going back to Quanzhou to get a passport,as she wanted to go to study for a second degree in Hong Kong. She also translated for us whenever the Chinese couple opposite wanted to ask us questions.

We exchanged phone numbers on arrival in Quanzhou and hope to meet up with her again.

Quanzhou has various interesting old Buddhist temples,a mosque and a few museums. We checked into our hotel and went out to explore. We found the Kaiyuan Temple to be very beautiful. It was a short bus ride from the hotel and we enjoyed the serenity of the temple.In the temple we met a beautiful tall Chinese girl who told us she was a Sports Major from Guangzhou and was obviously very keen to talk to us. Her English was very good and she was quite charming accompanying us around the temple and taking photos with us. We went with her from there to the Mosque which was not so impressive but on the way there we passed another temple which was really beautiful and ornate in the South Fujian style.

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Pagoda at Kaiyuan temple

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outside the other temple with Long Ping

Long Ping,our new friend said she was travelling alone and was continuing after Quanzhou to Xiamen and then back to Guangzhou. She invited us to go with her to a pop concert that night but we decided not to pay 250RMB each to see a Chinese pop singer,but said maybe we could meet her the next evening in Xiamen after we got back from our trip. Long Ping went off to look at Huaquiao University campus and we said goodbye. We had some supper in a Taiwanese fast food place and then took a taxi to the Brickyard a so-called British pub in another part of the city not far from our hotel. It being Happy hour we got free Qingdao beer and peanuts but failed to meet anyone interesting there and left when the Karaoke got started. We were exhausted anyway.

Next morning after the breakfast buffet at our hotel (bacon,eggs,sausage and lots of weird Chinese vegetables) we set off to see the Overseas Chinese Museum. On the way we ran into a kind of promotion of various food and drinks. Danny threw some beanbags at a target and won two bottles of some Chinese liquor. When my student gets here I shall ask him what it is.

The Overseas Chinese Museum proved to be very interesting,and also free of charge. It outlined the lives of the people who left China during the colonial period,to escape being exploited as “coolie labourers” and went to build a new life for themselves overseas. It turns out that it was quite similar to the lives of Jews setting off to be immigrants in foreign shores and being enterprising ane making a fortune. Many such immigrants became industrial magnates in Singapore,Indonesia and the Philippines,thus incurring the racial hatred of the indigenous peoples who then massacred them. Many Chinese became wealthy from rubber and sugar plantations,and trade and sent money back to their families. They also set up clubs and welfare organizations for other overseas Chinese,and schools to teach their children about their Chinese language and culture. One of these was of course our very own Chen Jiageng who built the University city in Jimei where we work. Again I couldn’t help thinking of the attachment between the Diaspora Jewry and Israel. It seems we are not special in our wish to preserve our culture or to help our fellow countrymen when we are abroad.

After the museum and a short walk in Dongu Park across the road we got the train back to Xiamen.

Me and Batman in the Pub Street,Quanzhou

Me and Batman in the Pub Street,Quanzhou